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Specific examples of our intangible traditions include — among many other customs, skills and practices – Dance, Music and story telling, Aboriginal languages and cultural knowledge, regional dialects, and the expressive culture, values and beliefs of the diverse cultural groups of Ontario. Many of us play music or tell stories; some of us know about ethnic dance traditions or speak several languages, as others know about cooking ethnic foods; some of us harvest Maple Sugar or bake traditional Ukrainian bread.

Our Mission

In 2015 the Community Folk Art Council of Toronto (CFAC) will be starting a new dialogue with the Province of Ontario to implement a new Intangible Cultural Heritage Strategy.

The mission is to safeguard and sustain the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Ontario for present and future generations, as a vital part of the identities of Ontarians, and as a valuable collection of unique knowledge and customs. This will be achieved through policies that support initiatives that celebrate, record, disseminate and promote our living heritage and help to build bridges between diverse cultural groups within and outside Ontario.

What is Intangible Cultural Heritage

The term ‘cultural heritage’ has changed content considerably in recent decades, partially owing to the instruments developed by UNESCO. Cultural heritage does not end at monuments and collections of objects. It also includes traditions or living expressions inherited from our ancestors and passed on to our descendants, such as oral traditions, performing arts, social practices, rituals, festive events, knowledge and practices concerning nature and the universe or the knowledge and skills to produce traditional crafts.

While fragile, intangible cultural heritage is an important factor in maintaining cultural diversity in the face of growing globalization. An understanding of the intangible cultural heritage of different communities helps with intercultural dialogue, and encourages mutual respect for other.

The importance of intangible cultural heritage is not the cultural manifestation itself but rather the wealth of knowledge and skills that is transmitted through it from one generation to the next. The social and economic value of this transmission of knowledge is relevant for minority groups and for mainstream social groups within a State, and is as important for developing States as for developed ones.

Intangible cultural heritage is:

  • Traditional, contemporary and living at the same time: intangible cultural heritage does not only represent inherited traditions from the past but also contemporary rural and urban practices in which diverse cultural groups take part;
  • Inclusive: we may share expressions of intangible cultural heritage that are similar to those practised by others. Whether they are from the neighbouring village, from a city on the opposite side of the world, or have been adapted by peoples who have migrated and settled in a different region, they all are intangible cultural heritage: they have been passed from one generation to another, have evolved in response to their environments and they contribute to giving us a sense of identity and continuity, providing a link from our past, through the present, and into our future. Intangible cultural heritage does not give rise to questions of whether or not certain practices are specific to a culture. It contributes to social cohesion, encouraging a sense of identity and responsibility which helps individuals to feel part of one or different communities and to feel part of society at large;
  • Representative: intangible cultural heritage is not merely valued as a cultural good, on a comparative basis, for its exclusivity or its exceptional value. It thrives on its basis in communities and depends on those whose knowledge of traditions, skills and customs are passed on to the rest of the community, from generation to generation, or to other communities;
  • Community-based: intangible cultural heritage can only be heritage when it is recognized as such by the communities, groups or individuals that create, maintain and transmit it – without their recognition, nobody else can decide for them that a given expression or practice is their heritage

Promotion of Intangible Cultural Heritage Montreal, August 12, 2014 Folklore Canada International Members Culture & Intangible cultural Heritage are part of the sustainable development Folklore Canada International is progressing in its actions for the promotion of Intangible Cultural Heritage in our society by presenting conferences, shows, festivals, exchanges, lobbying or studies or in encouraging its members to do so. We are contacting you because the United Nations will accept, this fall 2014, a plan for sustainable development that will follow on from the world millennium plan accepted in 2000, and in which culture and heritage were not mentioned. We strongly believe in the need for an human rights based approach to development and in that putting people first is recognizing the unique transformative power of culture. Development will have been truly achieved when all citizens can participate in and enjoy the music, dance, literature, visual representation, heritage and all other expressions of the arts and culture of their own community and beyond. Folklore Canada International just signed the Declaration for the inclusion of culture in the UN Sustainable Development goals post 2015. We are asking to all Community Folk Art Council members and Folklore Canada International members to sign this Declaration. We are hoping that in doing so, it will influence not only the leaders of the world, but also that it will encourage the associations in cultural heritage to show how active they are and how much they believe in the importance of cultural heritage and diversity of cultural expressions. To sign the document, we invite you to go to the following Website: www.culture2015goal.net and to click on « Sign Now! » where you will find a form to fill out. We thank you for your commitment in the promotion the intangible cultural heritage and for your collaboration in its safeguard. Please accept kindest regards, Guy Landry, General Director